Clinical Trials

  • Almost 40,000 people get HIV in the U.S. each year and almost all occur via sexual contact, especially male-to-male contact. The number of new infections has decreased slightly each year, however, we need other HIV prevention tools, such as developing a greatly, effective HIV vaccine, to better reduce HIV infections. An HIV vaccine is the best long-term hope for ending AIDS. We are looking for healthy, 18-60 year old and HIV-negative people to join studies we conduct. SCREENING AND EDUCATION: 1.
  • Antibodies are one of the natural ways that our bodies fight or prevent infection. Were testing an antibody to find out if its safe, if they don't make people feel uncomfortable, how these study antibodies move throughout the body, and to measure antiviral activity. You cannot get HIV from the study antibody. Firstly, request to be contacted by our study team. We'll follow up by asking you to complete a brief electronic pre-screen questionnaire to find out if you meet basic study criteria.
  • Antibodies are one of the natural ways that our bodies fight or prevent infection. Were testing an antibody to find out if its safe, if it doesn't make people feel uncomfortable and to find out what may be the best dose if its given by IV infusion or sub-cutaneous injection. You cannot get HIV from the Bispecific Antibody. We'll ask you to complete a brief online questionnaire at your leisure to find out if you meet basic study criteria.
  • Antibodies are one of the natural ways that our bodies fight or prevent infection. Were testing an antibody to find out if its safe, if it doesn't make people feel uncomfortable and to find out what may be the best dose if its given by IV infusion or sub-cutaneous injection. You cannot get HIV from the Bispecific Antibody. We'll ask you to complete a brief online questionnaire at your leisure to find out if you meet basic study criteria.
  • The purpose of this research is to find out whether an experimental drug called maribivar is safe, and whether it is more effective than the medications we usually use to treat resistant CMV infections. Half of the people who choose to be part of this research study will be given maribivar, and half will be treated according to their physicians usual practice. The groups will be assigned by chance, like by a toss of a coin.The majority of people at some time in their life become infected with CMV but do not know they have it.
  • We are looking for HIV-negative individuals 18 to 60 years old who are interested in learning more about HIV prevention research studies. We will ask you to complete a brief questionnaire to find out if we can schedule you for a one-on-one, 1-hour education visit to learn about the research we do. The education visit will help you decide if you want to participate in one of our studies. You will be compensated for the visit. Your responses to this questionnaire will be kept strictly confidential. We are currently enrolling into this study.
  • This research is being done to learn whether organ transplantation from HIV-positive deceased donors is as safe and effective in HIV-positive recipients as transplants from HIV-negative deceased donors. People with end-stage organ disease and HIV infection, and who qualify for organ transplantation, mayjoin this study.
  • We are doing a research study to find out if Long-Acting Injectable anti-HIV medications will be moresuccessful than standard pills for people who have a hard time taking their HIV pills. If you are over the age of 18 years old, have been prescribed HIV medications but have had difficulty getting undetectable viral load (when the levels of virus in the blood stream are so low that they can't bemeasured), you may be eligible. You may receive up to $1100 for the first 5 months of participation.Contact us to find out more about this study.
  • The MK-8228-002 Study is studying the safety and effectiveness of an investigational medication for preventing cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in adults with kidney transplants. The MK-8228-002 Study is evaluating an investigational medication (known as MK-8228) versus valganciclovir (VGCV). VGCV is an antiviral medication and is the current standard of care for CMV disease prevention in kidney transplant recipients. The study will last for approximately one year (52 weeks). Study treatment will start within seven days post-transplant and continue through 28 weeks.